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Half of your participation grade is classroom responses, and half is this participation assessment. This page is about the latter. The intent of the participation assessment is to encourage following along with class activities, which are usually live coding sessions. You’ll be putting all your in-class work in your own participation repository hosted on your GitHub user account, which we will evaluate at the end of the course.

Evaluation

Instructions on how to finalize and submit your participation repo are here. (Or here, if you’re in GitHub and not on the website.)

In short, we’re evaluating completeness, not correctness. You’ll be prompted in class when you should be contributing to your participation repository, and a full list of items will be posted below here. (The list will evolve as the semester progresses.)

Completeness (70%)

Your repository should be complete with all in-class exercises. Your work should resemble an honest attempt at the activities, but does not need to be anywhere near “correct” – even completely failing at an activity will earn you full marks here!

Each class session will receive equal weight.

Documentation (30%)

Your repository should be well-documented and structured.

Missing Class

If you miss class, you can still do the activities another time. Again, the point of this is “just to do the work.”

Setup

  1. On your user account, make a new repository:

    • Click the “+” in the top-right corner -> “New repository”
    • Call it FIN377-participation
    • I highly recommend making this a public repo. But if you so desire, make it private. You can change this later.
    • Say YES to initializing with a README.
  2. Add the teaching team as collaborators:

    • Click on “Settings” -> “Collaborators”.
    • Add the instructors: donbowen and danielappierto
  3. If you haven’t yet, please fill out this survey.

How to finalize and submit your participation repo

The instructions are here.

Acknowledgments

The approach here was initially borrowed wholesale from the wonderful STAT545 class. I’m sure it will change over time.